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Azincourt Archer’s Helmet

 

Carving the Azincourt Archer’s Helmet

Although the final refining of the of the Brigandine needed to be completed first as the hidden plates and rivets has been more difficult than I thought with all the undercarving of his accoutrements. This was further complicated by the end grain on the shoulders which revealed a wide variety of knots and inclusions that became more apparent as the work progressed.

Relief Carving the Helmet Rim

The rim of the helmet was cut to depth, relieved smoothly to define and slightly undercut to indicate it is rolled. The rivets that hold the internal webbing are marked in and delicately outlined with a small No 9 sweep due to the fragile nature of the yew wood in that area, great care being taken because of this.

The raised ridge that runs forward and aft of the helmet is defined by relieving either side,  then smoothing back to give the appearance of it being raised.

 

 

There now remains the other half of the beard yet to do and next week will be employed doing just that and tweaking, this should then complete the first figure. Work has been somewhat curtailed this week because a student was with me for 3 days intensive tuition. I enjoy this aspect as a refreshing diversion, made more enjoyable by us getting on so well and the fellows obvious talent and propensity for the discipline.

 

The next Figure will be Mark Stretton

The next stage is to do the patterns for the next archer, the formidably powerful Mark Stretton www.markstretton.blogspot.com

then the process begins again. This next figure should be easier to do because the first one is of a very well equipped archer with the top end equipment shown, he is not just an archer, as once all his arrows are loosed he can go into action with his sword and buckler as a man at arms.

The figure of Mark will not be quite so well equipped as he represents the top end of power and is accordingly lightly armed, not counting his mighty Warbow of course. This will speed the process of carving and I am looking forward very much to getting on with this.

 

 

 

 

 

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